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Chopping up a wav so nothing plays twice

How would you do this with the er-301? In effect, playing parts of a wav – selected let’s say randomly and of random length – so that the whole wav is played, and nothing twice,

The easiest route would be an arpeggiator with a ‘random - other’ setting, like the one in ableton, and a MIDI to CV converter.

I can only guess at what you would have to do with only the 301. Maybe a combination of Voltage banks and Counters to store which slices you’ve already hit. Then something to compare that to the current slice control, and subsequently pick a number not in the voltage bank. Accents has a logic unit that might be handy.

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bump, hope that’s ok… just something I really want to try.

if it’s too cpu intensive to do as described, it’d still be lots of fun to cut a wav up into say 20 parts, by hand, and play them in a random series… that should be relatively easy [i.e. i may get back to you]

just to clarify: is there any way of automating slice creation… i think manual loops may be what i need, but i still have to generate [non-repeating] loop points :upside_down_face:

this is what i’m thinking

  1. generate 4 to 8 random values between 0 and 1, of increasing size: 0.125 + random [white noise and sample and hold] * 0.125 [*]
  2. store into voltage block A, then delete the above.
  3. randomly select integers 1-8 with quantized white noise, and use that to select the index of voltage block A
  4. send the output of A to a manual loops and to a second voltage block B
  5. every time an integer 1-8 is generated compare it with every value in voltage block B, using a counter and logics, and if any are identical then generate a new integer
  6. add 1 to the index of voltage block A to get an end point

I think that will work, though you’ll need a tonne of micro delays. Guessing that, after the values are generated, you will need two voltage blocks, one counter, one logics, a white noise with sample and hold, manual loops, and a tonne of micro delays…

  • a more complete [so that the wav is always played completely] way of generating random start points would be better. one way of doing this would be 1/8+rnd*1/8 then [1-result/7] + rnd *[1-result/7]… etc.: so getting using the output of the voltage block to modulate the value into the voltage block [not sure I understand signal flow enough to make that a unit, rather than using one of the main outputs].

edit i did the latter but it is wrong.