Feedback on ER-301 Wiki-based Documentation

It’s really nice to have this all in one place, @anon83620728. When I joined “club ER-301”, the thread count in the forum was small enough to basically read all the posts in a couple hours spread out over a few days, and sort of assimilate all the existing knowledge. I think that would be pretty daunting for anyone who jumped in now. Nice work!

2 Likes

Cheers :smiley:

Having been here right from the beginning I have followed everything along the way, but yep - I went through it all again to write the FAQ hehe :joy:

The weirdest thing was seeing posts I’d made myself that I initially had absolutely no recollection of posting, it was almost like a different person made them. I’d always remember doing it eventually, but some of them did take some time before the memories came back… I’m getting old!

1 Like

I have experienced that before. Kind of surreal. “Did somebody hack my account? Oh, no that was me. “

1 Like

Another swing of the pickaxe…:pick:

http://wiki.orthogonaldevices.com/index.php/ER-301/Limiter

2 Likes

Looks great!

Looks great; learned a few things here about the limiter. Really like the notes and added tips.

One thing I frequently use a limiter for outside of the ER-301 is increasing perceived loudness. I will often do this in a DAW by putting a limiter on the master track, setting the limit param (not avail on 301) to around -0.1 dB, and then increasing the input gain, just to get the perceived volume of the track up to be comparable with professionally produced/mastered music (at the cost of squashing some dynamics).

Would you say that’s a fair use of the limiter in the ER-301, whether on a master track or individual voice? Guess that might fall under ‘gain staging’?

What do you think is the difference between the ER-301 limiter and your DAW limiter?

https://www.soundonsound.com/sound-advice/q-dynamics-processors-whats-difference

Interesting article.

The one in my DAW has a few additional controls, and the nomenclature of the controls is different, but I guess they fundamentally do the same thing. :slight_smile:

Attack and Decay time and ratio are the obvious omissions, I wouldn’t imagine that the ER-301 limiter would be able to match your DAW limiter without these.

Although you could probably work the ratio out with the pre and post gains, it’s just not explicit.

I’ve been trying to think of a way that you could patch this up and intuitively it should be possible with the currently available units, and also side chain compression too.

I’m not sure if i am overthinking it, I haven’t tried it, but a combination of the ADSR, VCA, Limiter and Mixer units could get you quite a bit of the way there.

I’d be interested to read about and hear any attempts to do this!

I get the sense that you knew that already. So what was the question? :spy: Are you asking how to replicate your DAW’s limiter with the ER-301 limiter?

1 Like

Even if @Joe isn’t, I would like to know :smiley:

Well, we would first need to know exactly what your DAW’s limiter is doing. But then as soon as you know that the answer kind of pops out. :smile_cat:

Hehe… You’re such a tease sometimes :joy:

Compression seems to be one of the least understood functions, I know it took me quite some time to wrap my head around it.

Just remembered @NeilParfitt talked about this:

Perhaps there is no question. I might have been half suggesting an additional tip/application note, and half pulling the wool from over my eyes. :slight_smile:

I mentioned to @anon83620728 about the track that I shared yesterday that I was proud of it because everything was done inside the modular. I only used a PC to record a single stereo track, apply some fades to the beginning and end, and added a limiter to increase the perceived volume. It is now dawning on me that I could have done all of this with the ER-301 and used a computer only to upload it to Soundcloud!

1 Like

A limiter is a kind of compressor that is memory-less (i.e. attack and release are not needed) and the output is bounded (compressors do not necessarily limit the signal output except of course at the power rails). Everything else is just design (tongue firmly in cheek). A wave-folder is a type of limiter!

4 Likes

I see somehow I missed the limiter specific aspect of this :blush:

I’m not going to change it, but if anyone cares, re-read it thinking compressor, not strictly a limiter :slight_smile:

4 posts were merged into an existing topic: The Loudness Wars… are over?

Probably because it’s one of the few effects where what it was designed to do is completely different from how it’s applied in a modern exaggerated recording context.

1 Like

Since it’s all about how you use it, describing this unit was simpler than I thought it would be.

http://wiki.orthogonaldevices.com/index.php/ER-301/Manual_Grains

Now you are painting with sound! :paintbrush:

1 Like

Somehow I missed in the original announcement that manual grains had polyphony 16. I thought it truncated the current grain when a new one triggered. This is both awesome, and I think explains why I didn’t understand what was happening with it at times. :slight_smile:

Will polyphony be exposed as a parameter someday?

PS - your new avatar is awesome, @odevices.

2 Likes