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Sample editing, lost my way

I never got the hang of editing samples on the 301, and think I need some pointers. Where can I read about the sample editing possibilities on the 301? Including what edits are possible where and which button combos to use. Sorry if this is stupid and documented to death, but I’m lost…

I’m currently floating round firmware 0.4.2x…

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ya know, i’m pretty new to the ER-301 but i feel exactly the same. probably haven’t done enough digging in the forums/reading around the wiki but i’d love a nice concise answer to this as well.

I’m not sure there’s any documentation in the wiki about this yet. I go through some examples in these tutorials:

http://wiki.orthogonaldevices.com/index.php/How_to_resample_a_single_cycle_waveform
http://wiki.orthogonaldevices.com/index.php/Solo_Trumpet_Performance

Probably the main thing that would be confusing is that some of the operations expect you to have part of the waveform selected before you can perform the operation. So place the cursor at the start or end point, hold down shift and then move the cursor to make a selection, which will be highlighted brighter than the rest of the waveform. Maybe that will help as a starting point?

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Thanks, Joe, that looks very helpful!

  1. When do I know if an operation is destructive?

  2. Is there a way to copy the original sample when doing destructive edits, either before or as a part of the edit operation?

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They are all destructive: trim, cut, normalize, silence, fade in, fade out, and remove DC. They’re destructive in the sense that they actually modify the waveform. There’s no single undo. There is a revert option that undoes everything you’ve done at once and restores it back to the original buffer state.

These operations are just affecting the buffer in RAM, and not being auto-committed to disk. So when you’re finished you can just do a save as from the file operations further down in the menu if you want to make a new file with your changes, while preserving the original. Possibly you can do a save as before you start editing if you want to make an identical copy of the original.

I’d recommend experimenting on some throw-away wave file, just to get comfortable with the workflow.

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Thanks, that makes sense!

So actually I could just have the edits only live in quick saves…